Trainee Opportunities

Postdoctoral position in the Kousteni Lab

A post-doctoral position is available in the lab of Dr. Stavroula Kousteni at the Physiology Dept. (also member of the Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center and Columbia Stem Cell Initiative). We are a dynamic, highly-collaborative group that investigates research topics at the interface of genetics, stem cell, and cancer biology https://biology.columbia.edu/people/kousteni and https://www.stemcell.columbia.edu/csci-member-spotlight/july-2019-kousteni-lab

We study the multiple functions of mesenchymal stem cells of the bone marrow in hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) fate, with an emphasis in the development of myeloid hematological malignancies: Myelodysplasia (MDS) and Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML). Specifically, we are exploring how extrinsic factors triggered from the bone marrow stroma microenvironment can affect growth of disease-initiating stem cells from healthy HSCs in MDS or AML as well as the transformation of MDS to AML. We are also identifying and characterizing myeloid-inducing mutations in cells of the bone marrow stroma. Those affect various stages of the diseases, from pathogenesis to transformation of MDS to AML. In these studies, we use a combination of mouse models, patient-derived cells and large sequencing approaches.

We are seeking highly-motivated applicants with a Ph.D. degree, preferentially with a background in stem cell biology and/or cancer research. Expertise with genetic mouse models (overexpression, knockout and knockin), flow cytometry, tissue culture, imaging techniques, single-cell sequencing, genomic analyses would be advantageous.

To apply, please send a CV, detailed description of research experience and future interests, and the names of three references to Stavroula Kousteni, Ph.D. at sk2836@cumc.columbia.edu.   

 

 

Postdoctoral fellow in the Mace Lab (1)

Position Summary:

We study the cell biology of human immune cells using biochemistry, biophysics and multiscale, multidimensional quantitative imaging and analyses. Our overarching goal is to dissect the contact-dependent mechanisms that drive the maturation of human natural killer (NK) cells and the role that cell migration plays in these processes. We have extensive experience in the use of primary human cells to model and manipulate human NK cell development in vitro. Positions are currently open on an NIH-funded project with the aim of defining the requirement for cell migration and NK-stromal cell interactions in human NK cell development. 

What we offer:

  • A supportive environment with the opportunity for intellectual and professional growth
  •  Opportunities to gain experience in cutting edge cell biological and biophysical techniques, particularly high- and super-resolution microscopy and image analysis
  • Excellent environment and resources at Columbia University in New York NY
  • Fully funded position (renewed annually for up to 5 years)

What we seek:

  • Collaborative, ambitious individuals with a strong interest in our research and environment
  • Ability to work independently to develop research projects and mentor others
  • Fearlessness in the design and implementation of new techniques and approaches to model human immune cell function
  • Strong verbal and written communication skills
  • Computational background is an asset

Application Materials

  •  CV
  • Cover letter including a paragraph describing how your research interests fit with the job described
  • Contact information for 3 reference
  • Email to: em3375@cumc.columbia.edu  

 

 

 

 

Postdoctoral fellow in the Mace Lab (2)

Position Summary: ​

The goal of this project is to define the requirement for the eukaryotic DNA helicase in human natural killer (NK) cell development. This project arises from the study of human NK cell deficiency, and we have extensive experience in the use of primary human cells to model and manipulate human NK cell development in vitro. Positions are currently open on an NIH-funded project with the aim of understanding why mutations in the eukaryotic DNA helicase lead to isolated human NK cell deficiency and extreme susceptibility to viral infection and malignancy. 

What we offer: 

  • A supportive environment with the opportunity for intellectual and professional growth  
  • Opportunities to gain experience in cutting edge genetic and cell biological techniques, including in vitro modeling of human immune cell differentiation
  • Excellent environment and resources at Columbia University in New York NY
  • Fully funded position (renewed annually for up to 5 years)

What we seek:

  • Collaborative, ambitious individuals with a strong interest in our research and environment Ability to work independently to develop research projects and mentor others
  • Fearlessness in the design and implementation of new techniques and approaches to model human immune cell function
  • Strong verbal and written communication skills
  • Experience with human immune cells an asset

Application Materials

  • CV
  • Cover letter including a paragraph describing how your research interests fit with the job described
  • Contact information for 3 references
  • Email to: em3375@cumc.columbia.edu